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vol.33 issue1MEDICAL MUMMIES: THE HISTORY OF THE BURNS COLLECTIONUN PLANTEAMIENTO EXPERIMENTAL DE REPLICACIÓN: REGISTRO Y CONSERVACIÓN DE UNA MOMIA CHNCHORRO TARDÍA author indexsubject indexarticles search
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Chungará (Arica)

On-line version ISSN 0717-7356

Abstract

GUSTAFSSON, Monica. HOW IS IT THAT CHINCHORRO HAS BECOME PART OF THE WESTERN SWEDISH CULTURAL HERITAGE?. Chungará (Arica) [online]. 2001, vol.33, n.1, pp.103-105. ISSN 0717-7356.  http://dx.doi.org/10.4067/S0717-73562001000100018.

In 1924, the Swedish researcher Carl Skottsberg took a collection from South America to the museum of ethnography in Göteborg. Among the artifacts in this collection were the so called "twin mummies" from Arica, Chile, excavated by Max Uhle. After being exhibited for many years, the twins were banished to storage. During filming that took place in storage at the end of the 1980s, the twins' heads were crushed. In 1994 the twins were moved to the Studio of the Western Sweden Conservators Trust (SKV). That was the beginning of extensive work between the Studio and the ethnographic museum, with mummies and human remains in general, and the twins and Chinchorros in particular

Keywords : Chinchorro mummies; Max Uhle; conservation.

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