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Revista chilena de pediatría

versión impresa ISSN 0370-4106

Resumen

ROJAS A, Rosario  y  QUEZADA L, Arnoldo. Relationship between atopic dermatitis and food allergy. Rev. chil. pediatr. [online]. 2013, vol.84, n.4, pp.438-450. ISSN 0370-4106.  http://dx.doi.org/10.4067/S0370-41062013000400012.

The term "allergic march" refers to the history of different atopic manifestations throughout the patient's life. Children with food allergy (FA) are more predisposed to the development of other allergic diseases such as atopic dermatitis (AD), asthma and allergic rhinitis. AlD and FA coexist to a greater extent in patients with early signs of AD, aggressive and persistent symptoms. Meanwhile, FA is a precipitating factor to AlD especially in patients with IgE-mediated FA. Correlation to delayed manifestations of FA may also be found. Epithelial barrier dysfunction, mainly attributed to mutations in the filaggrin gene, has been described as a possible trigger for allergen sensitization by increasing skin permeability. This study describes general characteristics of DA and current research evidence regarding the role of FA in the DA development, management and prevention strategies. Also, the utility of diagnostic tests, treatment and prevention in children with DA and FA are discussed. The restoration of impaired skin barrier to prevent sensitization to antigens may have an important role to prevent the development of allergic diseases, especially respiratory diseases.

Palabras clave : Food allergy; atopic dermatitis; skin tests; specific IgE; patch test; oral challenge; elimination diet.

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