SciELO - Scientific Electronic Library Online

 
vol.134 issue4Risk factors and prevalence of allergic rhinitis among Chilean childrenPrimary biliary cirrhosis: a thirteen years experience author indexsubject indexarticles search
Home Pagealphabetic serial listing  

Services on Demand

Journal

Article

Indicators

Related links

Share


Revista médica de Chile

Print version ISSN 0034-9887

Abstract

SOLER V, Tamara; SALAMANCA F, Lucía  and  MOLINA, Eliana. In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of anaerobic bacteria isolated from pleuropulmonary infections. Rev. méd. Chile [online]. 2006, vol.134, n.4, pp.465-468. ISSN 0034-9887.  http://dx.doi.org/10.4067/S0034-98872006000400009.

Background: Aspirative pleuropulmonary infections are usually caused by anaerobic flora of the mouth, mainly Prevotella, Fusobacterium and Peptostreptococcus spp. Penicillin in high doses is the traditional treatment for this type of infections but the rising resistance developed in recent years has induced the empiric use of clindamycin, increasing treatment costs. Aim: To study antimicrobial susceptibility of anaerobic bacteria isolated from pleuropulmonary infections. Material and methods: Thirty two strains obtained from bronchoalveolar lavage and 15 strains isolated from pleural effusions between 2000 and 2002, were studied. The phenotype of strains was identified using the semiautomated API 20 A method and their susceptibility to penicillin (PNC), clindamycin (CM) and chloramphenicol (CAF) was tested using the E test methods. Results: All the strains were susceptible to CAF, 95% to CM and 74.4% to PNC. The predominant genus was Prevotella, which also exhibited the higher resistance. Conclusions: As CM and CAF are active "in vitro", high rates of clinical response should be expected. In contrast, PNC is less effective, especially against pigmented Prevotella

Keywords : Anti-bacterial agents; bacteria, anaerobic; Drug-resistance, microbial; Prevotella.

        · text in Spanish     · Spanish ( pdf )

 

Creative Commons License All the contents of this journal, except where otherwise noted, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License